Monthly Archives: May 2010

Throwing down the Gauntlet! The 48 Hour Book Challenge: June 4 to June 7


48 Hour Book Challenge

While  catching up on One Literature Nut’s blog post about the end of the year and her goals for the summer, I decided to join her in the Fifth Annual 48 Hour Book Challenge.

The Fifth Annual 48 Hour Book Challenge is being organized by Mother Reader at The Heart of  a Mother. The Soul of a Reader.

When:
From June 4 (Friday) at 7 am to June 7 (Monday) at 7 am.
Choose your own 48 hour period within those days and times.  The 48 hours should be consecutive. You need to do at least 12 hours straight to qualify for any of the prizes.

Starting Post – on the date that you enter the challenge
Final Post –  noon on June 7 (Monday) is the deadliest deadline

Track your time carefully (no cheating by rounding up!) because the prizes will be based on time logged and not the number of books completed.  The top 3 participants win a special mention and prizes.

What:
Books should be about fifth-grade level and up. Adult books are fine. Graphic novels can be included in the reading. One audiobook can also be included in your time and book total.

Writing time counts too. There’s no specific requirement or guideline as to the length of review or type of notes that you post.  A sentence, paragraph, or a full length review are all welcome.  The time that you spend reviewing is counted towards your total time.  Keep track!

Time spent reading other participant’s blogs, commenting on participating blogs, Facebook pages, Tweeting about your progress counts too (Don’t forget to use the #48hbc tag!) For every five hours, you can add one hour of networking. Count this in your total time.

How:
If you decide to join, know the specific date and time that you intend to begin.   Comment here and let me know that you’re in. I’ll cheer you on as I go about the challenge!  

On the first day of your challenge, write a post about the challenge, your goals, etc.  and then leave the link to that post (via Mr. Linky) at the Starting Line post at MotherReader.   MotherReader’s Starting Line post will be up on June 4.

Do keep a meticulous log.

At the end of the challenge or when you’re finished, write a final summary that states:
 – hours and partial hours spent (I plan to use 6 minute intervals or 1/10th of an hour)
 – describe whether the time was spent reading, reviewing or networking
 – the number of books read
 – and any other comments that you might have

Your final summary must be posted by noon on Monday, June 7.  Then submit the link to your post to the Finish Line on MotherReader.   Mother Reader will put up the Finish Line on Sunday.

Bonus Points:
Last year the organizers linked the 48 Hour Book Challenge with charitable causes.  MotherReader suggests supporting book and literacy causes and has recommended using  Donors Choice, an organization that links teachers in need of supplies with donors, to help find a cause. She’s selected a school in DC and will donate $1 per hour to the school. 

My pet project:
I’ve been thinking of sending books to a school library in the Philippines.  Throughout the year that I’ve been blogging, I’ve been setting aside books that I’d like to ship back to the Philippines.  Postage is expensive, close to $70 per box, so I’m being very selective.  I’m just sending books that I loved, books that I know will draw a child to reading, books that they’ll want to share with friends.   You know those books that as soon as you finish them you want to hand them over to someone else who will appreciate the book for the gift that it is?   Remember how you felt the first time you read A Wrinkle In Time or White Fang or The Island of the Blue Dolphins or The Hobbit or Catch-22 or Slaughterhouse V?  Or The Importance of Being Earnest or I, Claudius?  Each one of those made such an impact on me.

The Philippines is a country of very limited resources and our government can’t afford to spend on public libraries.  Even those that sell books for a living, can’t survive on the sale of books.  Our largest and most profitable bookstore is a combination of Staples and Barnes and Noble and I remember reading that their real profit comes from the sale of school supplies.  While things have improved since I was growing up and booksellers do a good job of getting relatively new books to the country and now offer a range of books,  they’re still relatively expensive and not as varied as what you’d find in your neighborhood bookstore or library in the US.

When I was growing up, books were even more limited.  We’d read books that we bought ourselves or that we’d borrowed from family and friends (many a friendship was soured by irresponsible borrowing), our school libraries, and the few private libraries in Metro Manila.  My mother would return with a huge box of books each time she visited the United States — she would buy several years worth of reading for the three of us.   I spent most of my allowance on books, much the same way that my nieces and nephews do now.

The British Government funded The British Council, a wonderful lending library in a gorgeous and well maintained turn of the century house.  For a small fee, it was possible to join the British Council and borrow all sorts of British literature and nonfiction books.   I didn’t learn to drive until I finished college and the first route that I mastered was from my parents’ house to the British Council and back.  The British Council has since sold most of their fiction holdings and has relocated to a modern building and has limited its selection to nonfiction and more business related books. 

I remember also being able to borrow childrens’ books from a lending library on Camp John Hay, a rest and recreation base in Baguio City that was managed by the United States Air Force at a time when the US maintained military bases in the Philippines.  Camp John Hay  and Baguio City are in the Northern part of the Philippines, high in the mountains and about a 12 hour drive from Manila.  Baguio had always been a popular vacation spot because its higher altitude.  Baguio City was one of the planned cities, designed by the Daniel Burnham while the Philippines was under U.S. colonial rule.   This is my long way of saying that I’m also grateful to the United States Air Force for making the childrens’ library available to Americans and non-military personnel.  It was such an unexpected treat!  My brothers, cousins, and I would spend summers in Baguio.   My cousins would rush to play softball, roller skate, miniature golf, and bowl.   But my favorite place was the Camp John Hay library  where I found and read Ramona the Pest, and all the Beverly Cleary and Roald Dahl that I could find.  At that time, local bookstores didn’t carry these books.  My mother would take me and my brother to the John Hay library almost every day. 

Even today, your average reader in the Philippines won’t have access to much of the wonderful books that we have here.  I’ve been setting aside books to send to that I think would be wonderful additions to my old all girl’s school for the middle school and high school library.  My first box of books will be to my all girls’ school, Maryknoll (now “Miriam College” but it goes from preschool to college).    I’d love to send books to my brothers’ schools or the Philippine Science High School.  Or to a library of a public school.  It isn’t hard to come up with the books — I’ve noticed that people even leave books on the street here in my Brooklyn neighborhood.  It’s just coming up with a way to pay for shipping. 

What books made an impact on you when you were younger?  Do you have any books to recommend — for me to read or to send to the elementary school or high school or college in the Philippines?  Please comment below — suggestions most welcome!!


Logging off!
I’m off to rest, plan which books to read, and gather my thoughts on BEA, the Book Blogger Convention and the publishing house tours.    Do you think you’ll join the 48 Hour Book Challenge?

Throwing down the Gauntlet! The 48 Hour Book Challenge: June 4 to June 7


48 Hour Book Challenge

While  catching up on One Literature Nut’s blog post about the end of the year and her goals for the summer, I decided to join her in the Fifth Annual 48 Hour Book Challenge.

The Fifth Annual 48 Hour Book Challenge is being organized by Mother Reader at The Heart of  a Mother. The Soul of a Reader.

When:
From June 4 (Friday) at 7 am to June 7 (Monday) at 7 am.
Choose your own 48 hour period within those days and times.  The 48 hours should be consecutive. You need to do at least 12 hours straight to qualify for any of the prizes.

Starting Post – on the date that you enter the challenge
Final Post –  noon on June 7 (Monday) is the deadliest deadline

Track your time carefully (no cheating by rounding up!) because the prizes will be based on time logged and not the number of books completed.  The top 3 participants win a special mention and prizes.

What:
Books should be about fifth-grade level and up. Adult books are fine. Graphic novels can be included in the reading. One audiobook can also be included in your time and book total.

Writing time counts too. There’s no specific requirement or guideline as to the length of review or type of notes that you post.  A sentence, paragraph, or a full length review are all welcome.  The time that you spend reviewing is counted towards your total time.  Keep track!

Time spent reading other participant’s blogs, commenting on participating blogs, Facebook pages, Tweeting about your progress counts too (Don’t forget to use the #48hbc tag!) For every five hours, you can add one hour of networking. Count this in your total time.

How:
If you decide to join, know the specific date and time that you intend to begin.   Comment here and let me know that you’re in. I’ll cheer you on as I go about the challenge!  

On the first day of your challenge, write a post about the challenge, your goals, etc.  and then leave the link to that post (via Mr. Linky) at the Starting Line post at MotherReader.   MotherReader’s Starting Line post will be up on June 4.

Do keep a meticulous log.

At the end of the challenge or when you’re finished, write a final summary that states:
 – hours and partial hours spent (I plan to use 6 minute intervals or 1/10th of an hour)
 – describe whether the time was spent reading, reviewing or networking
 – the number of books read
 – and any other comments that you might have

Your final summary must be posted by noon on Monday, June 7.  Then submit the link to your post to the Finish Line on MotherReader.   Mother Reader will put up the Finish Line on Sunday.

Bonus Points:
Last year the organizers linked the 48 Hour Book Challenge with charitable causes.  MotherReader suggests supporting book and literacy causes and has recommended using  Donors Choice, an organization that links teachers in need of supplies with donors, to help find a cause. She’s selected a school in DC and will donate $1 per hour to the school. 

My pet project:
I’ve been thinking of sending books to a school library in the Philippines.  Throughout the year that I’ve been blogging, I’ve been setting aside books that I’d like to ship back to the Philippines.  Postage is expensive, close to $70 per box, so I’m being very selective.  I’m just sending books that I loved, books that I know will draw a child to reading, books that they’ll want to share with friends.   You know those books that as soon as you finish them you want to hand them over to someone else who will appreciate the book for the gift that it is?   Remember how you felt the first time you read A Wrinkle In Time or White Fang or The Island of the Blue Dolphins or The Hobbit or Catch-22 or Slaughterhouse V?  Or The Importance of Being Earnest or I, Claudius?  Each one of those made such an impact on me.

The Philippines is a country of very limited resources and our government can’t afford to spend on public libraries.  Even those that sell books for a living, can’t survive on the sale of books.  Our largest and most profitable bookstore is a combination of Staples and Barnes and Noble and I remember reading that their real profit comes from the sale of school supplies.  While things have improved since I was growing up and booksellers do a good job of getting relatively new books to the country and now offer a range of books,  they’re still relatively expensive and not as varied as what you’d find in your neighborhood bookstore or library in the US.

When I was growing up, books were even more limited.  We’d read books that we bought ourselves or that we’d borrowed from family and friends (many a friendship was soured by irresponsible borrowing), our school libraries, and the few private libraries in Metro Manila.  My mother would return with a huge box of books each time she visited the United States — she would buy several years worth of reading for the three of us.   I spent most of my allowance on books, much the same way that my nieces and nephews do now.

The British Government funded The British Council, a wonderful lending library in a gorgeous and well maintained turn of the century house.  For a small fee, it was possible to join the British Council and borrow all sorts of British literature and nonfiction books.   I didn’t learn to drive until I finished college and the first route that I mastered was from my parents’ house to the British Council and back.  The British Council has since sold most of their fiction holdings and has relocated to a modern building and has limited its selection to nonfiction and more business related books. 

I remember also being able to borrow childrens’ books from a lending library on Camp John Hay, a rest and recreation base in Baguio City that was managed by the United States Air Force at a time when the US maintained military bases in the Philippines.  Camp John Hay  and Baguio City are in the Northern part of the Philippines, high in the mountains and about a 12 hour drive from Manila.  Baguio had always been a popular vacation spot because its higher altitude.  Baguio City was one of the planned cities, designed by the Daniel Burnham while the Philippines was under U.S. colonial rule.   This is my long way of saying that I’m also grateful to the United States Air Force for making the childrens’ library available to Americans and non-military personnel.  It was such an unexpected treat!  My brothers, cousins, and I would spend summers in Baguio.   My cousins would rush to play softball, roller skate, miniature golf, and bowl.   But my favorite place was the Camp John Hay library  where I found and read Ramona the Pest, and all the Beverly Cleary and Roald Dahl that I could find.  At that time, local bookstores didn’t carry these books.  My mother would take me and my brother to the John Hay library almost every day. 

Even today, your average reader in the Philippines won’t have access to much of the wonderful books that we have here.  I’ve been setting aside books to send to that I think would be wonderful additions to my old all girl’s school for the middle school and high school library.  My first box of books will be to my all girls’ school, Maryknoll (now “Miriam College” but it goes from preschool to college).    I’d love to send books to my brothers’ schools or the Philippine Science High School.  Or to a library of a public school.  It isn’t hard to come up with the books — I’ve noticed that people even leave books on the street here in my Brooklyn neighborhood.  It’s just coming up with a way to pay for shipping. 

What books made an impact on you when you were younger?  Do you have any books to recommend — for me to read or to send to the elementary school or high school or college in the Philippines?  Please comment below — suggestions most welcome!!


Logging off!
I’m off to rest, plan which books to read, and gather my thoughts on BEA, the Book Blogger Convention and the publishing house tours.    Do you think you’ll join the 48 Hour Book Challenge?

A little down time


It’s been a while since I’ve checked in.  This week was hectic starting with the visits to the publishing houses on Monday and Tuesday, BEA on Wednesday and Thursday, and the first Book Blogger Convention on Friday.   I was running around with irregular meals and little sleep; I somehow caught the flu.

In the meantime, here’s a picture of Ramey, my uncle’s chow and one of the friendliest dogs I know.  Ramey lives in Boston & in Gloucester, MA.  He was having a hard time coping with the heat, so he had his first short cut.

He’s feeling much more himself now!

More news on BEA, the publishing house tours, and the Book Blogger Convention soon.  In the meantime, I hope everyone has a wonderful Memorial Day weekend!

A little down time


It’s been a while since I’ve checked in.  This week was hectic starting with the visits to the publishing houses on Monday and Tuesday, BEA on Wednesday and Thursday, and the first Book Blogger Convention on Friday.   I was running around with irregular meals and little sleep; I somehow caught the flu.

In the meantime, here’s a picture of Ramey, my uncle’s chow and one of the friendliest dogs I know.  Ramey lives in Boston & in Gloucester, MA.  He was having a hard time coping with the heat, so he had his first short cut.

He’s feeling much more himself now!

More news on BEA, the publishing house tours, and the Book Blogger Convention soon.  In the meantime, I hope everyone has a wonderful Memorial Day weekend!

Book Blog Tour of Amazon Queen by Lori Devoti


Hi everyone!  Things have been hectic this week.  Yen of The Book Publicity Blog and the organizers of the Book Bloggers Convention arranged for tours at different publishing houses.  I want to write much more about the visits and will in the next few days.   I’ll just say that the peek into this side of the book business was fascinating.  More on the visits later! 

Now, please join us for the Book Blog Tour of Lori Devoti’s Amazon Queen.  I’m afraid that this post will be bare bones for the moment.  I’ll share my thoughts on the book in a subsequent post.  

Amazon Queen (Amazons, Book 2)
ISBN-10: 1439167729 – Mass Market Paperback $7.99 
Publisher: Pocket (April 27, 2010), 375 pages.  Review copy provided by the publisher.

The blurb:
Being an Amazon ruler just became a royal pain.

Amazon queen Zery Kostovska has never questioned tribe traditions.  After all, these rules have kept the tribe strong for millennia and enabled them to live undetected, even in modern-day America.  Zery is tough, fair, commanding — the perfect Amazon leader.

At least, she was.  A new high priestess with a penchant for secrecy and technology is threatening Zery’s rule.  Plus, with the discovery of Amazon sons, males with the same skills as their female counterparts, even Zery can’t deny that the tribe must change.  But how?  Some want to cooperate with the sons.  Others believe brutal new leadership is needed — and are willing to kill to make it happen.

Once, Zery’s word was law.  Now, she has no idea who to trust, especially with one powerful Amazon son making her question all her instincts.  For Zery, tribe comes first, but the battle drawing near is unlike any she’s faced before. . . and losing might cost her both the tribe and her life.

My thoughts/Review Part One:
While I was absorbing BEA, the recent visits to the publishing houses, and the discussions with other bloggers, I realized that there is so much more that I can do here at Starting Fresh.  I was reading Amazon Queen during my commute and trying to put a finger on what it was that drew me to Zery Kostovska, the Amazon Queen herself.  

There’s a scene in the book where Zery opposes another powerful woman in the tribe and suffers a significant loss of power because of her actions.  Zery was aware that her decision would significantly erode her power base, but she refused to sacrifice a weaker person to save herself and the “community at large.”   Zery’s decision to refuse when it was clear that she would be a great personal cost demonstrated her integrity.  Remember that book Integrity by Stephen Carter (1997) where he defined integrity?
Integrity
He gave examples of people acting with integrity, as he does in this excerpt.   As I understand, integrity is the willingness to take action or admit something because you know this to be right, correct, honorable, even at great personal cost. 

The Amazon Queen Zery does this – she follows what she knows is right, acts true to herself even as she knows that she will be made to suffer for it.  As I read the scene and watched the events unfold, I realized that I like Zery, that I love heroes that behave like heroes, people that strive in their ordinary lives to work hard,  be true, act with integrity. 

With this book blog, I have the opportunity and the excuse to dive into these sorts of books, to enjoy the hero’s struggle, realization and eventual triumph.

I’m not completely done with Amazon Queen and I promise to write a fuller review of the book soon.  I did want to say that I am enjoying the book so far and I’m rooting for Zery to win back her rightful place.

This book, talking to other bloggers, the BEA and the visits to the publishing houses have made me think of just how much I’m drawn to what I’ll loosely call “heroes” or people that struggle to act with integrity and to do what they know to be right, even if doing so means significant personal risk and sacrifice.

Walking home from the subway, I was thinking of the “heroes” that have made books memorable for me.  I’d like to do something focused on these heroes — I’ve got some ideas and will tell you guys more later.

I’ll read more of Amazon Queen — and will be back shortly to share my thoughts.    In the meantime, perhaps you’d like to head over to the other participating blogs to see how they found Amazon Queen.

Participating Sites:

Book Junkie: http://myfoolishwisdom.blogspot.com/
Books and Things: http://melissawatercolor.blogspot.com/
Books Gardens & Dogs: http://maryinhb.blogspot.com/
Taking Time For Mommy: http://takingtimeformommy.blogspot.com/
Readaholic: http://bridget3420.blogspot.com/
Jeanne’s Ramblings: http://www.jeannesramblings.com
See Michelle Read: http://seemichelleread.blogspot.com/
My Five Monkeys: www.tableforseven-julie.blogspot.com
Gnostalgia: http://gnostalgia.wordpress.com/
A Journey of Books: http://ajourneyofbooks.halfzero.net/
My Book Addiction and More: http://mybookaddictionandmore.wordpress.com/
The Wayfaring Writer: http://moonsanity.blogspot.com/
Pick of the Literate: http://bookrevues.blogspot.com/
Cheryl’s Book Nook: http://cherylsbooknook.blogspot.com/
Avid Reader: http://www.tarmyblogspot.blogspot.com/
Starting Fresh: http://startingfresh-gaby317.blogspot.com/
I Heart Book Gossip: http://juniperrbreeeze.blogspot.com/
Knitting and Sundries: http://www.jewelknits.blogspot.com/
The Bibliophilic Book Blog: http://www.bibliophilicbookblog.com/
Poisoned Rationality: http://lastexilewords.blogspot.com/
A Musing Reviews: http://www.amusingreviews.blogspot.com/
Booksie’s Blog: http://booksiesblog.blogspot.com/
Lucky Rosie’s: http://www.luckyrosiescreations.blogspot.com/

About the Author:
Lori Devoti is originally from the Missouri Ozarks, but also lived in Montana where she worked in the advertising departments of two daily newspapers. Currently she  lives in Wisconsin with her husband, two kids, and two dogs.

Thank you so much to Sarah and Pocket Books/Simon & Schuster  for this review opportunity!

Book Blog Tour of Amazon Queen by Lori Devoti


Hi everyone!  Things have been hectic this week.  Yen of The Book Publicity Blog and the organizers of the Book Bloggers Convention arranged for tours at different publishing houses.  I want to write much more about the visits and will in the next few days.   I’ll just say that the peek into this side of the book business was fascinating.  More on the visits later! 

Now, please join us for the Book Blog Tour of Lori Devoti’s Amazon Queen.  I’m afraid that this post will be bare bones for the moment.  I’ll share my thoughts on the book in a subsequent post.  

Amazon Queen (Amazons, Book 2)
ISBN-10: 1439167729 – Mass Market Paperback $7.99 
Publisher: Pocket (April 27, 2010), 375 pages.  Review copy provided by the publisher.

The blurb:
Being an Amazon ruler just became a royal pain.

Amazon queen Zery Kostovska has never questioned tribe traditions.  After all, these rules have kept the tribe strong for millennia and enabled them to live undetected, even in modern-day America.  Zery is tough, fair, commanding — the perfect Amazon leader.

At least, she was.  A new high priestess with a penchant for secrecy and technology is threatening Zery’s rule.  Plus, with the discovery of Amazon sons, males with the same skills as their female counterparts, even Zery can’t deny that the tribe must change.  But how?  Some want to cooperate with the sons.  Others believe brutal new leadership is needed — and are willing to kill to make it happen.

Once, Zery’s word was law.  Now, she has no idea who to trust, especially with one powerful Amazon son making her question all her instincts.  For Zery, tribe comes first, but the battle drawing near is unlike any she’s faced before. . . and losing might cost her both the tribe and her life.

My thoughts/Review Part One:
While I was absorbing BEA, the recent visits to the publishing houses, and the discussions with other bloggers, I realized that there is so much more that I can do here at Starting Fresh.  I was reading Amazon Queen during my commute and trying to put a finger on what it was that drew me to Zery Kostovska, the Amazon Queen herself.  

There’s a scene in the book where Zery opposes another powerful woman in the tribe and suffers a significant loss of power because of her actions.  Zery was aware that her decision would significantly erode her power base, but she refused to sacrifice a weaker person to save herself and the “community at large.”   Zery’s decision to refuse when it was clear that she would be a great personal cost demonstrated her integrity.  Remember that book Integrity by Stephen Carter (1997) where he defined integrity?
Integrity
He gave examples of people acting with integrity, as he does in this excerpt.   As I understand, integrity is the willingness to take action or admit something because you know this to be right, correct, honorable, even at great personal cost. 

The Amazon Queen Zery does this – she follows what she knows is right, acts true to herself even as she knows that she will be made to suffer for it.  As I read the scene and watched the events unfold, I realized that I like Zery, that I love heroes that behave like heroes, people that strive in their ordinary lives to work hard,  be true, act with integrity. 

With this book blog, I have the opportunity and the excuse to dive into these sorts of books, to enjoy the hero’s struggle, realization and eventual triumph.

I’m not completely done with Amazon Queen and I promise to write a fuller review of the book soon.  I did want to say that I am enjoying the book so far and I’m rooting for Zery to win back her rightful place.

This book, talking to other bloggers, the BEA and the visits to the publishing houses have made me think of just how much I’m drawn to what I’ll loosely call “heroes” or people that struggle to act with integrity and to do what they know to be right, even if doing so means significant personal risk and sacrifice.

Walking home from the subway, I was thinking of the “heroes” that have made books memorable for me.  I’d like to do something focused on these heroes — I’ve got some ideas and will tell you guys more later.

I’ll read more of Amazon Queen — and will be back shortly to share my thoughts.    In the meantime, perhaps you’d like to head over to the other participating blogs to see how they found Amazon Queen.

Participating Sites:

Book Junkie: http://myfoolishwisdom.blogspot.com/
Books and Things: http://melissawatercolor.blogspot.com/
Books Gardens & Dogs: http://maryinhb.blogspot.com/
Taking Time For Mommy: http://takingtimeformommy.blogspot.com/
Readaholic: http://bridget3420.blogspot.com/
Jeanne’s Ramblings: http://www.jeannesramblings.com
See Michelle Read: http://seemichelleread.blogspot.com/
My Five Monkeys: www.tableforseven-julie.blogspot.com
Gnostalgia: http://gnostalgia.wordpress.com/
A Journey of Books: http://ajourneyofbooks.halfzero.net/
My Book Addiction and More: http://mybookaddictionandmore.wordpress.com/
The Wayfaring Writer: http://moonsanity.blogspot.com/
Pick of the Literate: http://bookrevues.blogspot.com/
Cheryl’s Book Nook: http://cherylsbooknook.blogspot.com/
Avid Reader: http://www.tarmyblogspot.blogspot.com/
Starting Fresh: http://startingfresh-gaby317.blogspot.com/
I Heart Book Gossip: http://juniperrbreeeze.blogspot.com/
Knitting and Sundries: http://www.jewelknits.blogspot.com/
The Bibliophilic Book Blog: http://www.bibliophilicbookblog.com/
Poisoned Rationality: http://lastexilewords.blogspot.com/
A Musing Reviews: http://www.amusingreviews.blogspot.com/
Booksie’s Blog: http://booksiesblog.blogspot.com/
Lucky Rosie’s: http://www.luckyrosiescreations.blogspot.com/

About the Author:
Lori Devoti is originally from the Missouri Ozarks, but also lived in Montana where she worked in the advertising departments of two daily newspapers. Currently she  lives in Wisconsin with her husband, two kids, and two dogs.

Thank you so much to Sarah and Pocket Books/Simon & Schuster  for this review opportunity!

Book Blog Tour of Montana Destiny by R.C. Ryan


Welcome to the Book Blog Tour of R.C. Ryan’s Montana Destiny, the second in the McCord Cousins series!  Before we chat with R.C. Ryan, let me share a little about her latest book and R.C. Ryan’s background.

The blurb:
They’re the McCords. . . three rugged, sexy cowboy cousins who’ll inherit the family range — if they seek the treasure hidden on it.   But even more precious are the women who can tame their wild hearts.

Emergency medic Marilee Trainor likes her freedom and lives for trouble.  Then she stumbles upon a clue to the legendary McCord gold and suddenly finds herself in a mysterious killer’s sights — and in the arms of irresistible playboy Wyatt McCord.  This McCord cousin has been everywhere, yet the ranch is the only place he feels at home.  Now Marilee’s courage and independence make him want to protect her, win her heart, and finally settle down.  But trust is the one thing Wyatt and Marilee can’t easily give.  And their survival and everything they cherish depends on whether they can surrender to each other — to fight for their . . . Montana Destiny.

ISBN-10: 0446548634 – Mass Market Paperback $6.99

Publisher: Forever; 1 edition (May 1, 2010), 352 pages.
Review copy provided by the publisher.

About the Author:

New York Times bestselling author R.C. Ryan has written more than ninety fiction novels, both contemporary and historical. Quite an accomplishment for someone who, after her fifth child started school, gave herself the gift of an hour a day to follow her dream to become a writer.

The Lost, an anthology of stories by J.D. Robb, Mary Blayney, Patricia Gaffney, and R.C. Ryan writing as Ruth Ryan Langan was published in Fall 2009. Ms. Ryan’s story, “The Legacy,” is an exciting tale of intrigue and other-worldly adventure. 

In a career spanning more than twenty years, Ms. Ryan has given dozens of radio, television, and print interviews across the country and Canada, and has been quoted in such diverse publications as the Wall Street Journal and Cosmopolitan. She has also appeared on CNN News, as well as Good Morning America.  If you’d like to learn more about R.C. Ryan, visit her website at http://www.ryanlangan.com/about.html

We’re lucky to have R.C. Ryan with us today to discuss her inspiration for her latest novel, Montana Destiny.  Please welcome, R.C. Ryan!  R.C., thank you so much for taking the time to chat!

oOo

I’m often asked about my inspiration for my latest series.  It’s a difficult thing to explain.  As a writer I have sudden flashes of character, followed by long sessions of mulling the things I think shaped a particular person, his personality quirks, his sense of humor or duty or honor or whatever the outstanding qualities I think he should have.

The McCord family is like my own in some ways.  Large, noisy, sometimes quarrelsome, but always loving.  And at the core, we care deeply about one another.  We feel justified in fighting with one another, but if anyone outside the family dares to challenge one of us, he finds himself standing up to an entire clan.  We suffer with one another, and cheer one another’s successes. 

I like to think that everyone who reads these books will be able to identify with at least some of the members of this fascinating family.  I wanted them to be three-dimensional, living, breathing people that my readers would care about.  And I loved the idea of generations, because older members are often the narrators of family history to the younger generation.  I loved Cora and Cal.  I wanted my readers to see them first as they are, and then to learn in each book, who they were, and how they became the strong-willed people they are today.

I really love this family, and I’m so delighted that my readers love them, too.

   oOo

Large, noisy, sometimes quarrelsome, but always loving — that sounds a lot like my family as well!  I think that’s one of the reasons why I’ve really enjoyed reading about the McCord cousins in Montana Legacy and Montana Destiny.  I’m looking forward to finding out what happens to the third and last McCord cousin!  Thanks so much for stopping by, R.C. Ryan!

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