Monthly Archives: August 2009

Dieting? Want a donut? A low fat donut?!


I feel like I’ve been on a diet forever and that I’m always back to day one. Sometimes I try to jump start change, but know that constant vigilance and small steps make a difference. Small steps and vigilance are tough though. Sometimes it’s great to treat yourself with something tasty and not crazy fattening. I was very interested when I first heard about Holey Donuts. Great taste, less fattening? Lowfat donuts?

I haven’t tried them yet, I don’t trust myself with half a dozen donuts so I’m waiting for house guests before placing an order. But their September contest and promo are tempting. Check it out below! If it helps to know this, each donut is supposed to be 3 to 4 Weight Watcher Points.

Enter September 1st -30th 2009 to Win 3 boxes of Holey Donuts! Low Fat Gourmet Donuts! Maybe it will be you that finds the $1,000.00 inside this time!

5 Lucky winners will be selected to win 3 boxes each of Holey Donuts! Ultra Low Fat Gourmet Donuts! But wait! One winner will be the luckiest when they open their winning box of donuts with an ENVELOPE inside the box containing $1,000.00 Cash!

Great tasting, Low Fat Gourmet Donuts and a chance to win $1,000.00 Cash! It doesn’t get much better than that!

How Can I Enter? – Just visit www.holeydonuts.net then send Holey Donuts! an email with the name of my blog (Starting Fresh) in the subject line and your name and that’s it your entered! Winners will be randomly chosen by Holey Donuts! and will be announced the week after September 30, 2009.

*The $1,000.00 will be in the form of a corporate check made out to the winner. All 5 lucky winners will be notified via email but no-one will be told which lucky winner is getting the $1,000.00 until their shipment arrives and they see the SPECIAL ENVELOPE with a $1,000.00 check inside their shipment! How exciting is that? Winners are announced Holey Donuts’s website the week after Sept 30th.

Holey Donuts is giving out a coupon code, effective Sept 1st. If you buy 2 boxes, get the 3rd box of 6 for $1.99! The code is SKINNY1

Curious? Here’s what people have been saying about Holey Donuts/links to reviews:

Glamour Magazine
“I’m here to tell you yes–yes, yes, yes! I recently tried Holey Donuts and I can tell you they’re beyond delicious. “
http://www.glamour.com/health-fitness/blogs/vitamin-g/2009/03/afternoon-snack-lowfat-lowcal.html

Voted “Best tasting product of 2007′ Daily Candy @
http://www.dailycandy.com/sweetest_things/2007/everywhere/taste.jsp

FOX Morning Show @http://www.myfoxphoenix.com/dpp/azam/holey_donuts_052109
The Today Show @http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/22317708/
The Big Idea @http://www.cnbc.com/id/15840232?video=651158512

Latest sell out appearance on QVC!
http://www.qvc.com/qic/qvcapp.aspx/view.2/app.detail/params.item.M18670.desc.Holey
-Donuts-30piece-Reduced-Fat-Donut-Assortment

BLOGS

http://admin.hungry-girl.com/wednesdaypreview.php?newsletterid=1688
http://www.retailmenot.com/view/holeydonuts.net
http://www.cnbc.com/id/22096724/
http://www.weightwatchers.com/community/mbd/post.aspx?

Dieting? Want a donut? A low fat donut?!


I feel like I’ve been on a diet forever and that I’m always back to day one. Sometimes I try to jump start change, but know that constant vigilance and small steps make a difference. Small steps and vigilance are tough though. Sometimes it’s great to treat yourself with something tasty and not crazy fattening. I was very interested when I first heard about Holey Donuts. Great taste, less fattening? Lowfat donuts?

I haven’t tried them yet, I don’t trust myself with half a dozen donuts so I’m waiting for house guests before placing an order. But their September contest and promo are tempting. Check it out below! If it helps to know this, each donut is supposed to be 3 to 4 Weight Watcher Points.

Enter September 1st -30th 2009 to Win 3 boxes of Holey Donuts! Low Fat Gourmet Donuts! Maybe it will be you that finds the $1,000.00 inside this time!

5 Lucky winners will be selected to win 3 boxes each of Holey Donuts! Ultra Low Fat Gourmet Donuts! But wait! One winner will be the luckiest when they open their winning box of donuts with an ENVELOPE inside the box containing $1,000.00 Cash!

Great tasting, Low Fat Gourmet Donuts and a chance to win $1,000.00 Cash! It doesn’t get much better than that!

How Can I Enter? – Just visit www.holeydonuts.net then send Holey Donuts! an email with the name of my blog (Starting Fresh) in the subject line and your name and that’s it your entered! Winners will be randomly chosen by Holey Donuts! and will be announced the week after September 30, 2009.

*The $1,000.00 will be in the form of a corporate check made out to the winner. All 5 lucky winners will be notified via email but no-one will be told which lucky winner is getting the $1,000.00 until their shipment arrives and they see the SPECIAL ENVELOPE with a $1,000.00 check inside their shipment! How exciting is that? Winners are announced Holey Donuts’s website the week after Sept 30th.

Holey Donuts is giving out a coupon code, effective Sept 1st. If you buy 2 boxes, get the 3rd box of 6 for $1.99! The code is SKINNY1

Curious? Here’s what people have been saying about Holey Donuts/links to reviews:

Glamour Magazine
“I’m here to tell you yes–yes, yes, yes! I recently tried Holey Donuts and I can tell you they’re beyond delicious. “
http://www.glamour.com/health-fitness/blogs/vitamin-g/2009/03/afternoon-snack-lowfat-lowcal.html

Voted “Best tasting product of 2007′ Daily Candy @
http://www.dailycandy.com/sweetest_things/2007/everywhere/taste.jsp

FOX Morning Show @http://www.myfoxphoenix.com/dpp/azam/holey_donuts_052109
The Today Show @http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/22317708/
The Big Idea @http://www.cnbc.com/id/15840232?video=651158512

Latest sell out appearance on QVC!
http://www.qvc.com/qic/qvcapp.aspx/view.2/app.detail/params.item.M18670.desc.Holey
-Donuts-30piece-Reduced-Fat-Donut-Assortment

BLOGS

http://admin.hungry-girl.com/wednesdaypreview.php?newsletterid=1688
http://www.retailmenot.com/view/holeydonuts.net
http://www.cnbc.com/id/22096724/
http://www.weightwatchers.com/community/mbd/post.aspx?

Review: The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind: Creating Currents of Electricity and Hope by William Kamkwamba and Bryan Mealer


I am excited and honored to share my excitement about William Kamkwamba and his book, The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind: Creating Currents of Electricity and Hope. It tells the true story of William’s boyhood in Malawi, the challenges that his family faced and how William’s curiosity and dedication enabled him to imagine and create the windmill that would change his life.

The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind: Creating Currents of Electricity and Hope

About the book, courtesy of Amazon:

William Kamkwamba was born in Malawi, a country where magic ruled and modern science was mystery. It was also a land withered by drought and hunger, and a place where hope and opportunity were hard to find. But William had read about windmills in a book called Using Energy, and he dreamed of building one that would bring electricity and water to his village and change his life and the lives of those around him. His neighbors may have mocked him and called him misala–crazy–but William was determined to show them what a little grit and ingenuity could do.

Enchanted by the workings of electricity as a boy, William had a goal to study science in Malawi’s top boarding schools. But in 2002, his country was stricken with a famine that left his family’s farm devastated and his parents destitute. Unable to pay the eighty-dollar-a-year tuition for his education, William was forced to drop out and help his family forage for food as thousands across the country starved and died.

Yet William refused to let go of his dreams. With nothing more than a fistful of cornmeal in his stomach, a small pile of once-forgotten science textbooks, and an armory of curiosity and determination, he embarked on a daring plan to bring his family a set of luxuries that only two percent of Malawians could afford and what the West considers a necessity–electricity and running water. Using scrap metal, tractor parts, and bicycle halves, William forged a crude yet operable windmill, an unlikely contraption and small miracle that eventually powered four lights, complete with homemade switches and a circuit breaker made from nails and wire. A second machine turned a water pump that could battle the drought and famine that loomed with every season.

Soon, news of William’s magetsi a mphepo–his “electric wind”–spread beyond the borders of his home, and the boy who was once called crazy became an inspiration to those around the world.

Here is the remarkable story about human inventiveness and its power to overcome crippling adversity. The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind will inspire anyone who doubts the power of one individual’s ability to change his community and better the lives of those around him.

Review:

Even if you don’t usually read nonfiction or memoirs, I still think that you’ll love this book for the writing, the story, and because of William Kamkwamba.

William tells the story of his childhood in the small agricultural village in Malawi. From the the general bias towards magic and superstition over science, the crippling impact of the drought, and the isolation and difficulties that William, his village, and Malawi, the obstacles that they face are huge and clear. Reading the book, I first thought that my experiences in the “Third World” helped me understand the William’s life from the superstition to the the impact of the drought and the opportunistic price gouging during the famine. But that interpretation fails to give enough credit to William and his book. The power of his story and the clarity of the writing surely guarantee that The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind will speak to people regardless of their experience and their home country. I cannot recommend this book more! I look forward to more news from William Kamkwamba and to meeting him during his book tour stop in NYC.

Publisher: William Morrow (September 29, 2009), 288 pages.

Courtesy of the Harper Collins and the author.

William Kamkwamba

About the Author, courtesy of Amazon:

William Kamkwamba was born in Dowa, Malawi, in 1987 and raised in Masitala village along the central plains. One of seven children born to sustenance farmers who grew maize and tobacco, his childhood was often interrupted by drought and hunger.

At age twelve, Kamkwamba became fascinated with electricity—a luxury enjoyed by only 2 percent of Malawi. He taught himself radio repair and began tinkering with bicycle dynamos, hoping to understand the inner workings of generators. During a devastating famine in 2001 –02, William dropped out of high school during his first semester. As thousands died across the country, he continued his education by visiting a small library near his village that was funded by the American government. After seeing windmills on the cover of an 8th-grade science book, he set out to build his own machine using scavenged parts from a scrap yard. His first windmill was made from PVC pipe, a tractor fan, an old bicycle frame, and tree branches, and powered four light bulbs and charge mobile phones. A second windmill pumped water for a family garden.

Local news outlets discovered Kamkwamba in 2007, which led to a stage appearance at the TEDGlobal conference in Arusha, Tanzania. It was the first time he’d ever been on an airplane or seen the Internet. The appearance at TED, and a subsequent front-page feature in the Wall Street Journal, sparked a flood of international support, and soon William returned to school and completed much-needed improvements in his village farm, such as adding drip irrigation to shield his family against future drought. He’s now a student at African Leadership Academy in Johannesburg, South Africa, and recently completed a biography: The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind: Creating Currents of Electricity and Hope with coauthor Bryan Mealer.

Bryan Mealer is the author of All Things Must Fight to Live: Stories of War and Deliverance in Congo, which chronicled his experience covering the war in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Mealer is a former Associated Press staff correspondent and his work has appeared in several magazines, including Harper’s and Esquire.





To read the BBC article about William Kamkwamba visit http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/8165262.stm

Visit William Kamkwamba’s blog at http://www.williamkamkwamba.typepad.com/

Here are a few of the upcoming book tour events:

Tuesday, September 29, 2009

CBS-TV/CBS SUNDAY MORNING

Tuesday, September 29, 2009

ABC/Good Morning America

Tuesday, September 29, 2009

BARNES & NOBLE/Tribeca

97 Warren ST New York, NY 10007

Thursday, October 01, 2009

Museum of Science and Industry

Thursday, October 01, 2009

WAMU-FM/Diane Rehm Show

Friday, October 02, 2009

BARBARA’S BOOKSTORE/UIC Campus

1218 South Halsted Chicago, IL 60607

Thank you so much to Tavia, Harper Collins and William Kamkwamba for the opportunity to review the book!

Book Review: Queen Vernita Visits the Blue Ice Mountains by Dawn Menge


Queen Vernita Visits the Blue Ice Mountains

Queen Vernita is the active and outgoing leader of the Land of Quails with the Blue Ice Mountains. Queen Vernita enjoys spending time with children and invites 12 guests. Each guest stays for a full month and Queen Vernita takes the child to explore and learn about a different part of the world. While describing the adventures for the month, the book teaches children about the days in each month and the concept of the leap year.

Here’s a summary of the things that Queen Vernita covers in the 12 visits:

January – the different types of crabs, their exoskeletons, lifespans, and physical characteristics.

February – sea otters, their fur and physical characteristics and their lifestyle.

March – learning how glaciers are made, how they get their blue color, the different types of glaciers, and their relationship to icebergs.

April – different wild flowers like monkshood, salmonberry, bunchberries, forget-me-nots, and irises.

May – different types of whales and how they breathe.

June – bald eagles, their characteristics and their skill in the air.

July – grizzly bears, polar bears, black bears, and glacier bears.

August – the animals, trees, and environment of a rain forest.

September – Aurora Borealis and its magnificent lights.

October – harbor seals, bearded seals, ice seals, spotted seals, ringed seals, and ribbon seals.

November – starfish, rockfish, sponges, sea whips, sea anemones, and tree coral in the ocean.

December – the North Pole, ringed seals, polar bears, artic foxes, artic birds and even an elf from Santa’s workshop.

The drawings are colorful and the book is full of facts. I learned some things through this book, but it wasn’t for me because I prefer children’s stories with fantastic stories. I can see how it would be a fun and helpful book for curious children, parents, and teachers. The book is most definitely educational!

Thank you so much to Bostick Communications and Dawn Menge for the opportunity to review this book!

Review: The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind: Creating Currents of Electricity and Hope by William Kamkwamba and Bryan Mealer


I am excited and honored to share my excitement about William Kamkwamba and his book, The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind: Creating Currents of Electricity and Hope. It tells the true story of William’s boyhood in Malawi, the challenges that his family faced and how William’s curiosity and dedication enabled him to imagine and create the windmill that would change his life.

The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind: Creating Currents of Electricity and Hope

About the book, courtesy of Amazon:

William Kamkwamba was born in Malawi, a country where magic ruled and modern science was mystery. It was also a land withered by drought and hunger, and a place where hope and opportunity were hard to find. But William had read about windmills in a book called Using Energy, and he dreamed of building one that would bring electricity and water to his village and change his life and the lives of those around him. His neighbors may have mocked him and called him misala–crazy–but William was determined to show them what a little grit and ingenuity could do.

Enchanted by the workings of electricity as a boy, William had a goal to study science in Malawi’s top boarding schools. But in 2002, his country was stricken with a famine that left his family’s farm devastated and his parents destitute. Unable to pay the eighty-dollar-a-year tuition for his education, William was forced to drop out and help his family forage for food as thousands across the country starved and died.

Yet William refused to let go of his dreams. With nothing more than a fistful of cornmeal in his stomach, a small pile of once-forgotten science textbooks, and an armory of curiosity and determination, he embarked on a daring plan to bring his family a set of luxuries that only two percent of Malawians could afford and what the West considers a necessity–electricity and running water. Using scrap metal, tractor parts, and bicycle halves, William forged a crude yet operable windmill, an unlikely contraption and small miracle that eventually powered four lights, complete with homemade switches and a circuit breaker made from nails and wire. A second machine turned a water pump that could battle the drought and famine that loomed with every season.

Soon, news of William’s magetsi a mphepo–his “electric wind”–spread beyond the borders of his home, and the boy who was once called crazy became an inspiration to those around the world.

Here is the remarkable story about human inventiveness and its power to overcome crippling adversity. The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind will inspire anyone who doubts the power of one individual’s ability to change his community and better the lives of those around him.

Review:

Even if you don’t usually read nonfiction or memoirs, I still think that you’ll love this book for the writing, the story, and because of William Kamkwamba.

William tells the story of his childhood in the small agricultural village in Malawi. From the the general bias towards magic and superstition over science, the crippling impact of the drought, and the isolation and difficulties that William, his village, and Malawi, the obstacles that they face are huge and clear. Reading the book, I first thought that my experiences in the “Third World” helped me understand the William’s life from the superstition to the the impact of the drought and the opportunistic price gouging during the famine. But that interpretation fails to give enough credit to William and his book. The power of his story and the clarity of the writing surely guarantee that The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind will speak to people regardless of their experience and their home country. I cannot recommend this book more! I look forward to more news from William Kamkwamba and to meeting him during his book tour stop in NYC.

Publisher: William Morrow (September 29, 2009), 288 pages.

Courtesy of the Harper Collins and the author.

William Kamkwamba

About the Author, courtesy of Amazon:

William Kamkwamba was born in Dowa, Malawi, in 1987 and raised in Masitala village along the central plains. One of seven children born to sustenance farmers who grew maize and tobacco, his childhood was often interrupted by drought and hunger.

At age twelve, Kamkwamba became fascinated with electricity—a luxury enjoyed by only 2 percent of Malawi. He taught himself radio repair and began tinkering with bicycle dynamos, hoping to understand the inner workings of generators. During a devastating famine in 2001 –02, William dropped out of high school during his first semester. As thousands died across the country, he continued his education by visiting a small library near his village that was funded by the American government. After seeing windmills on the cover of an 8th-grade science book, he set out to build his own machine using scavenged parts from a scrap yard. His first windmill was made from PVC pipe, a tractor fan, an old bicycle frame, and tree branches, and powered four light bulbs and charge mobile phones. A second windmill pumped water for a family garden.

Local news outlets discovered Kamkwamba in 2007, which led to a stage appearance at the TEDGlobal conference in Arusha, Tanzania. It was the first time he’d ever been on an airplane or seen the Internet. The appearance at TED, and a subsequent front-page feature in the Wall Street Journal, sparked a flood of international support, and soon William returned to school and completed much-needed improvements in his village farm, such as adding drip irrigation to shield his family against future drought. He’s now a student at African Leadership Academy in Johannesburg, South Africa, and recently completed a biography: The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind: Creating Currents of Electricity and Hope with coauthor Bryan Mealer.

Bryan Mealer is the author of All Things Must Fight to Live: Stories of War and Deliverance in Congo, which chronicled his experience covering the war in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Mealer is a former Associated Press staff correspondent and his work has appeared in several magazines, including Harper’s and Esquire.





To read the BBC article about William Kamkwamba visit http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/8165262.stm

Visit William Kamkwamba’s blog at http://www.williamkamkwamba.typepad.com/

Here are a few of the upcoming book tour events:

Tuesday, September 29, 2009

CBS-TV/CBS SUNDAY MORNING

Tuesday, September 29, 2009

ABC/Good Morning America

Tuesday, September 29, 2009

BARNES & NOBLE/Tribeca

97 Warren ST New York, NY 10007

Thursday, October 01, 2009

Museum of Science and Industry

Thursday, October 01, 2009

WAMU-FM/Diane Rehm Show

Friday, October 02, 2009

BARBARA’S BOOKSTORE/UIC Campus

1218 South Halsted Chicago, IL 60607

Thank you so much to Tavia, Harper Collins and William Kamkwamba for the opportunity to review the book!

Book Review: Queen Vernita Visits the Blue Ice Mountains by Dawn Menge


Queen Vernita Visits the Blue Ice Mountains

Queen Vernita is the active and outgoing leader of the Land of Quails with the Blue Ice Mountains. Queen Vernita enjoys spending time with children and invites 12 guests. Each guest stays for a full month and Queen Vernita takes the child to explore and learn about a different part of the world. While describing the adventures for the month, the book teaches children about the days in each month and the concept of the leap year.

Here’s a summary of the things that Queen Vernita covers in the 12 visits:

January – the different types of crabs, their exoskeletons, lifespans, and physical characteristics.

February – sea otters, their fur and physical characteristics and their lifestyle.

March – learning how glaciers are made, how they get their blue color, the different types of glaciers, and their relationship to icebergs.

April – different wild flowers like monkshood, salmonberry, bunchberries, forget-me-nots, and irises.

May – different types of whales and how they breathe.

June – bald eagles, their characteristics and their skill in the air.

July – grizzly bears, polar bears, black bears, and glacier bears.

August – the animals, trees, and environment of a rain forest.

September – Aurora Borealis and its magnificent lights.

October – harbor seals, bearded seals, ice seals, spotted seals, ringed seals, and ribbon seals.

November – starfish, rockfish, sponges, sea whips, sea anemones, and tree coral in the ocean.

December – the North Pole, ringed seals, polar bears, artic foxes, artic birds and even an elf from Santa’s workshop.

The drawings are colorful and the book is full of facts. I learned some things through this book, but it wasn’t for me because I prefer children’s stories with fantastic stories. I can see how it would be a fun and helpful book for curious children, parents, and teachers. The book is most definitely educational!

Thank you so much to Bostick Communications and Dawn Menge for the opportunity to review this book!

Barnes & Noble First Look Club Selection: Under This Unbroken Sky by Shandi Mitchell


I first discovered book blogs through Barnes & Noble’s First Look Book Club. One of the participants mentioned several book blogs and sources of ARCs. That was a few months and one FL Book Club selection ago.

I haven’t been able to be as active in my last First Look Book Club this August, but the book selection was terrific yet again. The FL selections are always by debut authors and they tend to be books that I wouldn’t have heard of on my own. I’ve enjoyed some more than others but these last few have been wonderful. Let me tell you more about Under This Unbroken Sky by Shandi Mitchell.

https://i2.wp.com/www.shandimitchell.com/test2/utuscanada/ukcover/files/page12_1.jpg

Canadian cover – US cover – UK cover

Synopsis, courtesy of Barnes & Noble (First Look discussions):

Spring 1938. After nearly two years in prison for the crime of stealing his own grain, Ukrainian immigrant Theo Mykolayenko is a free man. While he was gone, his wife, Maria, their five children, and his sister, Anna, struggled to survive on the harsh northern Canadian prairie, but now Theo-a man who has overcome drought, starvation, and Stalin’s purges–is determined to make a better life for them. As he tirelessly clears this untamed land, Theo begins to heal himself and his children. But the family’s hopes and newfound happiness are short-lived. Anna’s rogue husband, the arrogant and scheming Stefan, unexpectedly returns, stirring up rancor and discord that will end in violence and tragedy.

Review:

The story of Theo Mykolayenko and his family is heartbreaking and carefully crafted. Each character is well developed and tormented in his/her own way from Theo, his wife Maria and each of their children to his sister Anna, her husband Stefan and their two children. Reading Under This Unbroken Sky, it is hard to stop. The power comes from the beautiful melding of characters, events, and unforgettable writing.

If you are looking for an unusual and moving read, I highly recommend Under This Unbroken Sky by Shandi Mitchell.

About the Author, courtesy of her website:

Shandi Mitchell is a writer and filmmaker. She graduated from Dalhousie University with a degree in English and Theatre and then moved into film. Her award-winning shorts have been featured at festivals across North America. In 2008, she was awarded the Canada Council’s Victor Martin-Lynch Staunton Endowment for outstanding mid-career achievement in Media Arts.

IMG_2895_1

Her debut novel Under This Unbroken Sky has been sold in seven countries and was simultaneously published by Penguin Canada, Weidenfeld & Nicolson (UK) and Harper Collins (US) in August 2009.

Raised on the prairies, Shandi now makes her home on the east coast of Canada, very close to the water, where she lives with her husband, Alan, and their dog, Annie.

Learn more about Under This Unbroken Sky at Shandi Mitchell’s website.